Oksana Chusovitina Enters The International Gymnastics Hall Of Fame

Oksana Chusovitina

There can’t be a greater example to up and coming gymnasts than the charismatic Oksana Chusovitina. She may have been inducted into the International Gymnastics Hall of Fame, but that doesn’t mean her career is over.

The Sporting Legend And Role Model Just Keeps On Going

In fact, at the age of 42 the only woman to have competed in three Olympics for three different nations, is still going strong. She most recently performed on balance beam, floor exercise and vault at World Cup meets back in March. It would also seem Tokyo 2020 is still a realistic target for this disciplined gymnast who has also performed for the old Soviet Union, Germany and her native Uzbekistan in various other events.

Speaking at the induction awards ceremony in the States last weekend she told the assembled throng through her translator, former team-mate and now coach Svetlana Boginskaya: “It seems like this award is for people who retired. In this case, I am not, and you will never be alive until I retire. So keep waiting.”

Her sense of mischief is legendary of course, and she is naturally the only woman to be inducted into this supreme role of honour while still competing. When she arrived at the 2016 Rio Games, she became the first gymnast to compete in seven consecutive Olympics. And she wasn’t just there to make up the numbers either.

Chusovitina qualified to the vault final, where she threw a Produnova (handspring-double front), the hardest vault possible. She’s also won vault medals in an incredible nine World Championships. The Hall of Fame, housed in the Science Museum, Oklahoma, has now chronicled the exploits of 95 individuals from 22 countries.

And for the first time, the entire ceremony was streamed on Facebook LIVE.

In a colourful speech, she added: “I would like to thank my mother for longevity in the sport because she’s the one who didn’t want me to do it,” Chusovitina said Saturday. “I wanted to prove her wrong. With any child, you just want to do the opposite of what your parent tells you. So, thank you, mom. She always wanted for me to be scientist or piano player, or someone that was not an athlete, so thank you, mom, for making me an athlete. And I think when my mom actually will say, “Honey, I’m OK with you being a gymnast, maybe that will be the time where I will stop.”

Tribute To Her Son

Her son was diagnosed with leukaemia in October 2002, but made a full recovery and will turn 18-years-old in November. Her move to Germany was tied to her young son’s diagnosis, so they moved there to receive treatment. She went on: “As a mother, I would like to thank the gymnastics community all over the world. Because of their help, my child in cancer-free. He didn’t take a passion for gymnastics; he is afraid of heights. He is short, like me, but he likes basketball. And he believes he’s going to be a basketball player and be in NBA. He is short, but I don’t want to kill his dreams.”

Chusovitina’s career as an elite gymnast has spanned more than a quarter of a century. She won the USSR Junior Nationals in 1988 and began competing at the international level in 1989 before many of her current rivals were even born.

Chusovitina has also competed in 10 World Championships, three Asian Games and three Goodwill Games. She also holds the record for the most individual world championship medals in a single event (nine, on the vault).

The Petroleum Club also saw three other gymnasts inducted: Japan’s Shun Fujimoto helped Japan to the 1976 Olympic team title competing amazingly with a broken leg, Alexei Nemov, the 2000 Olympic all-around champion from Russia, is 11 months younger than Chusovitina but retired after the 2004 Olympics. She also received a warm welcome along with 2008 Olympic silver medallist Alicia Sacramone from America who retired four years ago.

Supporters and guests covered 15 countries, and it seems fitting the 21st coming of age ceremony should feature the exploits of one, Oksana Chusovitina, perhaps the greatest role model the sport has ever seen.

The Love To Move Programme: How British Gymnastics Is Helping Dementia Sufferers

The Love To Move Programme: How British Gymnastics Is Helping Dementia Sufferers

A recent report has revealed British Gymnastics Foundation’s chair-based gymnastics exercise programme for dementia sufferers, has been a great success so far. Research carried out by Age UK has confirmed the scheme was found to offer demonstrable benefits for those with mild to advanced forms of dementia. These included physical, emotional and cognitive aspects.

The Love to Move programme has the goal of getting older people moving and functioning better, with a view to improving the lives of those living with this life changing disease. Based on a similar programme developed by the Korean and Japanese Gymnastics Federations, the BGF has taken its core principles and adapted it for the British culture.

More than 150 people have been enjoying specially designed and unique ‘bilaterally asymmetrical exercises’ where the individual draws different patterns with the left-hand side of their body to the right-hand side. The exercises carried out over a long term period bring positive changes to posture, movement and memory as well as the social engagement of those taking part.

Providing Life-Changing Benefits

British Gymnastics Foundation Manager, Patrick Bonner, said: “This age and dementia friendly programme is astonishing people with its life-changing benefits. So many people involved are seeing their lives improving as a result of the programme and it is remarkable that people are regaining functions which were thought to be lost because of the Love to Move gymnastics based exercises.”

Recent assessments made by care home staff have revealed 10 out of 14 participants have noticed physical improvements. A total of 86% is now socialising with other residents and staff better. 13 out of 14 residents are reported to be happier and more settled. And amazingly 100 per cent of participants are now easier to connect with.

Several individuals are able to use their hands again to feed themselves, do crafts and play games. And to the delight of all involved, one participant, who began taking part in the sessions twice a week and who previously showed few signs of improvement, has now regained her independence. As a result, she’s been able to move back into her own home.

Many other people have been taken off hypertension medication, been lifted from depression and are now sleeping much better.

Positive Early Results

These are early findings of course, but it does seem as though much can be achieved through this ground-breaking project. All results in Asia have been positive with every aspect being state-funded, and now the scheme run by the BGF is set to become more widely available.

Vinal K Karania, Research Manager (Evaluation and Impact) at Age UK said: “For many of the older people participating, their external environment changed little and one can, therefore, be confident that much of the improvements observed will have been because of this programme.”

Programme ambassador, gymnast and two-time Olympian, Kristian Thomas, added: “It’s amazing to see what the Love to Move programme has achieved. Dementia affects so many people and to know that gymnastics is making their lives easier and improving their quality of life; it’s something I’m extremely happy to be a part of.”

Meanwhile, the Foundation has been striving to secure extra funding through a number of outlets including a crowdfunding campaign which you can now donate to. More staff will be trained in the next few months and a booklet containing some of the key exercises is available for people to download and try for themselves.

It’s more proof gymnastics is a sport also putting a great deal back into the community Why not visit www.britishgymnasticsfoundation.org/lovetomove for more information and to access the full report and Love to Move booklet.

Why The Attraction of Drills Could Be Hindering Your Gymnastics Training Plan

Gymnastics Coaching

It can be said of many coaches, that they are magnetised by preps and drills. The proverbial moth to a flame. But why? You would think a press conference had just commenced each time a new drill is introduced to the gymnastics training plan – such is the buzz that ensues.

Don’t think me judgmental in my assessment, I do understand the appeal – I’m not averse to introducing a good drill too, even to the point of filming it for my archive. Yet I recognise that the inclusion of drills is just another ingredient in the training pot, that too often does not attract the attention or thought it deserves.

Less is Definitely More

There are many things we use to train our gymnasts that probably don’t matter, and I always look for ways to reduce the number of steps or processes used in training.

An example would be a caddy advising a golfer, the number of good options when it comes to which club to use next are often limited, especially when there aren’t many to pick from in the first place!

For context let’s use a back flick (or ‘back handspring’) as an example.

There are thousands of drills and exercises to choose from to teach a gymnast a flick. Some good, some fantastic.

So how many do you need?

In my experience you can teach most skills in just a handful of stages – 4-5 steps say, assuming the gymnast has refined the prerequisite skills already.

4-5 drills which include specific performance and learning benefits is sufficient to teach gymnastics skills. More than this and your training plan could actually hinder a gymnast’s rate of learning and retention.

Balancing Gymnasts ‘Needs’ With Your Own Desires

If we were to leave out the impressive or glamorous drills we spend hours searching for on YouTube, we can teach an exceptionally good ‘flick’ in just 4-5 drills, simply by focusing on teaching high quality, basic movement.

Yes, the internet is a great place to find ideas and to share content, but it lacks any form of quality control. This means before you charge ahead implementing a new idea into your gymnastics training plan, you should stop and consider the following first:

  • Is it what the gymnast needs?
  • Is it simple enough to implement?
  • Can my gymnast already perform the pre-requisites?
  • Is the video from a credible source, with someone of experience?
  • Do I know what the learning outcomes are of the drill?

What is important to remember is that what your gymnast needs, may be at odds with what we like the look of as coaches…

I like to think of it as ‘shiny object attraction.’ The new Galaxy S8 smartphone looks amazing, but my current ‘older model’ will still perform just as well for the tasks I want it to do – make calls, send emails, receive texts etc. Having the latest ‘thing’ is not necessarily going to improve performance and there are better things to spend money and time on.

There are often many better ways to improve performance than perhaps some of the drills and preps you might be coaching your gymnasts.

It’s All In The Details

It pains me to say that I’ve failed to see significant improvements in gymnasts coached by those who spend many hours each week scouring online for more drills and exercises to add to their training program. It’s safe to say the internet has not helped them at all – they should really have been looking for the best recipe, rather than the individual ingredients.

Techniques do not really change much over time, but innovation has. Gymnasts of 30 years ago were performing some of the highest complexity acrobatic elements we see today but without the luxury of modern day equipment.

How?

It all comes down to using simple methods and exercises, and concentrating on the attention to detail when it comes to technique. 30 years ago much of the innovation we enjoy was not there, and neither was the virality of sharing ideas and content.

Let’s use a chef baking a dessert as an analogy here.

How many recipes do you think an experienced chef could come up with given basic, quality ingredients such as sugar, eggs, flour, butter and chocolate.

I’m guessing it would be a pretty extensive list and one which, with the right love and attention, would include a masterpiece or two.

My point is that you don’t need lots of ingredients. You just need the right recipe and attention to detail.

This is not to say that you shouldn’t be obsessive in other areas. I often see the top performing coaches excel in these three areas:

  • Being PRODUCTIVE.
  • Being ACCOUNTABLE.
  • Having exceptionally HIGH STANDARDS.

No matter how awesome your drills are, without these 3 qualities, you will never progress in the high-performance world.

So before you start searching YouTube for more drills to use, take a moment to reflect on your gymnastics training plan and ask yourself these questions:

  1. Are my gymnasts able to perform the current drills with great execution (if not then a new drill won’t suddenly help them to perform it better either.)
  2. Are the drills the problem, or is it the ratio of drills to practice?
  3. Do I have clarity on exactly what the finished skill should look like?
  4. Are the gymnasts physically prepared for the elements?

When you have the answers…then head off to YouTube 🙂

Article by Nick Ruddock, Gymnastics Club Manager’s resident coaching expert and International Gymnastics Coach and Consultant.

Team GB Trampoline Gymnasts: Bouncing To Glory

Laura Gallagher Team GB Trampoline Gymnasts: Bouncing To Glory

Both Laura Gallagher and Andrew Stamp have been bouncing with joy following their French Masters Open success. The likeable Team GB trampoline gymnasts have been hitting new highs in the sport for a while now.

So it was no surprise to see Laura take the women’s title with a total of 53.765 marks. This, having qualified for the final in second place. Andrew clearly took charge of the qualifications in the 15 to 17 year’s group. And it was glory all the way as he went on to win the final with a score of 56.730.

And we mustn’t forget the talented Corey Walkes of course who finished in 16th place in his own category. The whole event proved to be an exciting and sociable competition, thanks to the commitment and ethos of all those gymnasts, clubs and coaches who took part.

Trampolining is Terrific

In terms of gymnastics, trampolining is one of the most thrilling categories, and one of the most fascinating for those looking to take up the sport. How many children have enjoyed playing on a small compact trampoline in their own back garden?

It was George Nissen who, in the 1930’s watched trapeze artists performing tricks when bouncing off a safety net. He constructed the first modern trampoline in his garage to reproduce this on a smaller scale and enjoy his diving and tumbling activities.

George created a  company to build trampolines for sale and used a variant of the Spanish word trampoline (diving board) as a trademark. He’d enthral onlookers inviting them to participate in his demonstrations as part of his marketing strategy. It was, of course, the beginnings of a new sport.

Bouncing All Over The World!

It wasn’t long before trampolining became commonplace in American schools as part of physical education programmes. The sport declined there however largely because of inadequate training, but elsewhere in the world, the sport was most strongly adopted in Europe and the former Soviet Union.

Since trampolining became an Olympic sport in 2000. More nations have followed suit with China producing world champion athletes in less than a decade. The International Trampolining Federation became part of the Fédérationn Internationale de Gymnastique in 1999. FIG is now the international governing body for the sport, paired with Tumbling as the skill sets overlap.

International competitions are run under the rules of FIG. Individual national gymnastics organisations can make local variations to the rules in matters such as the compulsory and optional routines, and a number of rounds for national and local competitions.

Pike, Twist, Tuck…

Currently, individual trampoline competitions are made up of two or three routines, one of which may involve a compulsory set of skills. These consist of various combinations of somersaults, shaped bounces, body landings and twists performed in various body positions such as the tuck, pike or straight position.

In each routine, the athlete must perform 10 different skills on a standard 14 foot by seven-foot trampoline complete with a central marker. They must always finish on their feet. The routine is marked out of 10 by five judges with deductions for incomplete moves, moving too far from the centre mark or poor form.

Usually, the highest and lowest scores are discarded. Additional points can be added depending on the difficulty of the skills being performed.

Here in the UK, you can discover a number of clubs specialising in this thrilling sport. All have professional and well-qualified coaches – they are welcoming and openly encourage new members with a taste for adventure. Trampolining is fun and you can go at your very own pace, developing some simple routines as you go.

As for Laura Gallagher and Andrew Stamp? The sky’s the limit!

How To Send Group Emails To Your Gymnastics Club Membership & Check Delivery

Sending group emails with gymnastics club manager

Does this sound familiar? You need to send out an important communication to your gymnastics club membership, via email. But, all your member email details are stored on a separate spreadsheet meaning you not only need to locate the most up to date list but also copy and paste all email addresses over to your email service.

Worse still, your current email service isn’t set up to send to hundreds of email addresses all at once. You may also have concerns over the reliability of delivery and worry that your messages may end up in the recipient’s spam folder.

The upshot is you end up copying and pasting not just email addresses, but because you need to send the email out in batches, you have to copy and paste the message too. And let’s not even mention trying to personalise every email to each member.

Setting up email communications like this is super time consuming and we are betting it’s a task you (or your administrator) dread.

With Gymnastics Club Manager you can create and send emails directly from your membership database. As the video below will show you, with our software we make it really easy, and quick, to select your recipient list (choose everyone or just specific groups/classes), create your message, add personalisation with a simple mail merge tag and send.  And if some of your members do not have an email address, you can simply print your message as a letter and post it to them instead.

The title of this post also mentions checking delivery of your emails.

How many of your members tell you they didn’t receive an email from you? How can you check if all your messages were sent, if they were opened or landed in a spam folder? With our software, we will show you how many emails were delivered, how many were opened, as well as those that bounced back or contained an invalid email address. Just watch the video below to see this in action.

Sending out club wide communications needn’t be a task to dread. Ditch the copy-paste, spreadsheet-sorting tedium and switch to Gymnastics Club Manager. Not only can we make communicating with your members a breeze, but we can help you better manage your member information, collect and reconcile class fees and make registration quick and easy for new members.

Why not book a free consultation and let us show you more?

Barry Hearn: The New Face of 21st Century Gymnastics

Barry Hearn

There are many both younger and older involved in the sport of gymnastics who stayed up late to see the end of The World Championship Snooker Final. Those who did would have seen a familiar face during the presentation ceremony. A face now very much part of the furniture, but a face many still associate with snooker, darts, boxing and crown green bowls.

That face belonged to the enigmatic Barry Hearn, mentor of the great Steve Davis and innovator of so many events in sports across the years. It may come as a surprise to some, however, to discover Barry was behind the recent Sky television coverage of The World Cup of Gymnastics. What’s more, he’s also a huge fan, which is great news for every youngster and club member out there.

Promoting The World Cup of Gymnastics

Hearn, renown for jazzing up the coverage of sporting events in order to make them a more exciting product, announced a four-year partnership with Matchroom Sport to promote an annual World Cup of Gymnastics at the O2 Arena in London. The first event was a huge success as you might expect. Why? Because it was shown in its entirety, drawing in a whole new legion of fans.

The first one-day event – featured eight national teams competing in six men’s events and four women’s. What’s more all 18,000 seats available sold out extremely quickly, proving there’s a strong fan base out there much like snooker.

“I cannot believe the number of people who’ve told me they love gymnastics since the Olympics,” he said. “10.8 million watched Max Whitlock win gold on television. I was one of them. The trouble is, in the past, this was a sport that only surfaced every four years. Not anymore. It’s not just about a provincial domestic event, it’s about taking these guys and making them global superstars. Not just once every four years, but every day.”

Bringing Gymnastics To A Wider Audience

It’s already been noted next year’s event will bring with it a few new innovations, in true Barry Hearn style. But the sports traditions will be totally respected. This hasn’t been lost on gymnasts like Rio bronze medal winner Nile Wilson, who said: “When I first started competitions were held in sports halls in front of 50 people, all of whom were the parents of competitors. This is so exciting for the sport. “I’m going to call myself The Wilsonator – That’s got a ring to it.”

Jane Allen, the chief executive of British Gymnastics, added “The number of Britons who participate in gymnastics has grown by 10-15 per cent every year since 2011. When you’re having that sort of growth in your numbers, you feel a real benefit,” she says. “Our clubs are expanding too, and we’ve got better business models out there. They’re not just family clubs, they’re business clubs. They’re attracting investment. We’ve been very fortunate, we’ve got some very good athletes and without them, we wouldn’t have the product. But we’re also represented by 1,500 gymnastics clubs across the country. We haven’t staged a non-Olympic gymnastics event in London since 1975.Our strategy has been for some time to bring this event to London to bring it to the attention of a wider audience.”

Let’s be honest – why shouldn’t gymnastics become a mainstream sport? After all, those competing can do more with their bodies in terms of fitness and flexibility than most footballers. It could be argued they also work much harder at their game.

Viewers at the Olympics, of course, are spellbound by the amazing movement of everyone involved of course. The answer must be, let’s see more of the sport on television and on a regular basis. There’s no better way to bring youngsters into the sport.

How To Hit The Right Tone & Engage With Your Gymnastics Club Followers

Part 3 of Facebook Gymnastic Club Series

In this last part of our Facebook for Gymnastics Clubs Series, we take a look at the importance of getting the tone right with your posts, and we offer up some key tips to help you engage better with your page followers.

If you’ve missed the first two parts of this series you can catch with Part #1: Setting Up Your Gymnastics Club Facebook Page here and Part #2: Creating Content For Your Gymnastics Club Facebook Page here.

Getting The Tone Right

People don’t want to talk to an organisation or an anonymous entity that they have no connection with. Instead, they want to talk to people and they want to talk to you. How are you going to ensure you get the tone right?

You may find that there are a number of people who manage your Facebook page. It’s important to introduce them to your fans so that there is a greater level of interaction. The clubs that let the moderators interact directly with the fans get the greatest number of new fans and levels of engagement.

Therefore you could have a custom made tab which introduces the team behind the Facebook page. Display their avatar and a short description of them so they both feel valued and people know more about who they’re talking with. (If you want someone to create a tab for you and you’re not sure, go to peopleperhour.com).

Additionally, after each Facebook post, it might be a good idea for the person posting to leave a dash followed by their first name. This is far more likely to create user interaction and responses than a post solely by the club alone.

Whenever you’re talking to people, it’s important that you talk to them using their first names. In normal, everyday conversation, it’s rare that you address someone with a first name and surname.

To ensure you get the tone right, respond to what people are asking for, and make sure that you meet that need. Facebook is all about good conversations, and the tone that you post will either foster or hinder this.

Be More Engaging

It’s one thing to create your own quality content for your Facebook page so your fans share and comment on them, but it’s equally important to create a context to encourage your fans to post their own content. For example, following on from an event that your club holds, wouldn’t it be great if your fans were to post photographs of that event? Well, most of the time it would be (#badhairday).

The more that your Facebook page can become a destination for ideas and content to be exchanged without you being an over-protective gatekeeper, the greater the level of engagement with your fans. It then becomes a community for them.

To give this a chance to develop you want to create space for “super fans” to emerge. Super Fans are those who are highly motivated to engage with the community, post regular content and comments and to foster a sense of responsibility for your community.  Your immediate goal is to identify 100 people who love what your gymnastics club does and wishes to talk about it with others.

Once people are posting content it’s important to engage regularly with it. There’s nothing worse than someone spending the time and energy to start a conversation and for others in the room to ignore them. Especially in the early stages, don’t let a comment go unanswered. People connect with other people, so when the page feels like a safe space to be listened to and affirmed, people are far more likely to return and respond. The Super Fans will naturally help plug the gap as your club’s presence on Facebook grows and some will want to become moderators.

If you don’t initially ask people to do anything, they won’t. Give strong motivation and clear Call To Actions. One example of this would be asking people to “Like if you agree” with a statement you make. You can also try running competitions that people need to enter by submitting their own content or provide polls for people to respond to.

Creating an environment where people want to spend time interacting with you, your club and their community takes intentional listening, planning and implementation. But as you engage your content and interactions around meeting your customers needs, you’ll find your community will grow.

Naturally, as you create a community, some will leave unhelpful comments. If you find yourself in a situation where people are leaving negative posts, it’s appropriate to delete those and helpful to send that person a message to explain why it has been deleted.

Facebook is still the biggest and most popular social media platform in the world. Individuals, businesses, clubs and organisations alike, are all finding it the place to connect and engage with their target audience, friends, members….

Regular posts, interesting content and quick engagement can all contribute to raising your gymnastics club’s profile, reputation and numbers!

We hope you have enjoyed this series and have found it both insightful and useful. As you get started with Facebook, make sure you ‘Like’ our page and download our free Facebook eBook for more help with Facebook Pages.  

Kristian Thomas Named As British Gymnastics Foundation Sporting Ambassador

Kristian Thomas Named As British Gymnastics Foundation Sporting Ambassador

Kristian Thomas is the new ambassador for the British Gymnastics Foundation’s ground-breaking Love to Move programme. The scheme has been designed to help make life-changing differences to those living with dementia.

The likeable two-time Olympian takes up the story:  “I was approached by the British Gymnastics Foundation and straight away I knew it was something I’d like to be involved in. A lot of people know someone with dementia, so I thought it was a great opportunity to give back to the sport that’s helped me so much. I’m really hoping my experience within gymnastics can help people doing the programme to regain some of the functions they thought were lost.” This represents a clear example of how the sport can also benefit people in the community, so it’s not just about medals and glory.

One of Our Best-Loved Olympic Gymnasts

Kristian of course  is a long-standing member of both the England and Great Britain men’s teams. He was a member of the gold-winning British team in the 2012 European Championships team event, also winning a historic bronze in the same event at the 2012 Summer Olympics.

He won his first global individual medal in the 2013 World Championships, in the form of a vault bronze It was also the first global medal ever won in the vault by a British male gymnast. In 2015 he won his first major international title, gold in the floor exercise at the 2015 European Artistic Gymnastics Championships.

Very popular within the sport, Kristian will be working alongside the Foundation to help raise awareness of the programme, as well as being present at future fund-raising events with a view to helping expand the directive across the UK.

Dementia Sufferers Benefit From Love To Move Programme

Patrick Bonner, British Gymnastics Foundation Manager said: “We chose Kristian as our ambassador for the Love to Move Programme as he has experienced gymnastics at all levels and has a deep understanding of core gymnastics skills and how they are beneficial to people, no matter what their age or background. Kristian is currently doing a sports degree in Strength & Conditioning and as part of this is exploring how people living with dementia can benefit from exercise programmes. I hope that Kristian’s high profile as one of Great Britain’s best-loved Olympians can help raise awareness that gymnastics is more than just a sport and has the power to transform the lives of people most in need.”

It may come as a surprise to some seeing gymnastics linked with such a serious condition, but research carried out by Age UK has produced some exciting results. Experts have discovered ‘a demonstrable benefit in the physical, emotional and cognitive aspects of the 150 older people who have taken part in the scheme so far.

Love to Move has been delivered regularly in two care homes, one day centre and one community group in Cambridgeshire across the last year. Those older people having mild to advanced forms of dementia appear to benefit the most.

As for how he got involved in the sport, Kristian’s parents sent him to a club with the simply aim of improving his co-ordination. “I was always climbing and getting into things that I shouldn’t, so going to gymnastics channelled my energy,” he says.

“I also have a younger sister, Rebecca, and she was into gymnastics too.” The 23-year-old from Wednesfield astounded them, clearly showing a huge flair. The rest, of course, is history. Kristian was thrilled to have been asked to play such an important role, and you can be sure he’ll do a great job. They say gymnastics is for everybody, and few can argue with that statement.

Video Intro: How To Request Payment For Class Fees

Request payment for class fees with Gymnastics Club Manager

One of the best features of Gymnastics Club Manager is the ability to authorise, request and collect payments easily online – the software does all the work for you, no more collecting cash and coins before class starts.

Gymnastics Club Manager offers numerous ways to collect payment for the classes you run, as well as offering a choice of ways for members to pay. Of course, collecting fees begins with requesting payment. In the video below we walk you through how to setup your software to request payment for class fees, including sending out a request to multiple members, to individual members and applying discounts, e.g. a sibling discount. We’ll also show you how to schedule requests and set up the auto-renew feature.

If you find you are spending more time on club administration and member management, than you are coaching gymnastics, then Gymnastics Club Manager can help. Our software was created to help you better manage your members and admin.

With more than 100 tools and features, we can help you streamline your membership process, take the headache out of fee collections and ensure your member information is always up to date.

Book a free consultation here to see all the features our software has to offer and discover how you can change the way you manage your club admin – forever.

Artistic Excellence From The iPro World Cup Of Gymnastics

Amy Tinkler

Olympian Amy Tinkler from South Durham lifted a well deserved bronze at the 2017 iPro World Cup of Gymnastics in front of an excited crowd in the O2 Arena, London. The finest gymnast to come out of South Durham was greatly encouraged by the supportive home crowd who willed her to another superb medal.

The 2016 Olympic floor exercise bronze medallist and 2015 British all-around champion, performed powerfully across the apparatus through strong routines to record a total of 53.433. Victoria Nguyen from the United States took the silver with a score of 53.832, with Germany’s Tabea Alt claiming gold with an impressive 54.598.

The competition was intense, enthralling and hugely enjoyable for the lively spectators to watch. And of course, it notched up another landmark for the 17-year-old, whose list of credits makes wonderful reading.

A Bronze of Beauty For Amy Tinkler

A naturally thrilled Amy from Bishop Auckland said: “It’s amazing I’m so so happy. I’ve had some problems this year with my calf so coming into this I wasn’t sure what to expect. My performance was better than I thought it would be, I think I fed off the atmosphere of the home crowd. I loved all the support, it was like Rio all over again but even better with it being in Britain. I’ve never heard so many kids shouting “Amy, Amy!” that feels so special and for me, I love the pressure and the buzz of competition so they definitely helped me today.”

Her winning routine began on the vault with  a double twisting yurchenko, before moving onto the bars. A full twisting double back dismount drew great appreciation from both judges and fans. Amy’s difficult  layout on the beam saw her make a grab just to stay on. But as all top class athletes do, her resolve and will to win came shining through.

A strong dismount saved the day earning 12 marks. The big finish wasn’t far away however, as she looked to her favourite piece of apparatus in the final rotation. Lying in 4th, it was a case of changing gear to secure a medal. Her tumbling routine was flawless, the highlights being a full twisting double straight somersault and a double pike finish. Accumulating a further 13.233 marks was the clincher.

A Trio of British Medal Winners

Amy of course, becomes only the third British woman to win an individual gymnastics medal, following Beth Tweddle’s uneven bars bronze in 2012, and Bryony Paige’s silver trampoline success. At 16, she was actually the youngest member of the British team in Rio, receiving an open bus top welcome on returning to her native north-east.

A brilliant all rounder, she’s perhaps best known as one of our leading artistic gymnasts. In fact, she competed at the 2013 British Artistic Championships. In the All-Around competition this likeable star took second place with a final score of 53.800. She scored 14.050 in the vault, 12.100 on the uneven bars, 13.650 on the balance beam and 14.000 on the floor exercise.

Amy also competed in all four apparatus finals. In the vault final, she amassed 14.100 marks for her first vault, and 13.400 for her second, for an average total of 13.750, giving her the silver. Immensely talented, Amy makes her discipline look completely natural. She has of course, put many hours of hard work in from a very young age. And of course, she still has so much to look forward to in this new cycle.

Britain’s Georgia-Mae Fenton was also due to compete alongside Amy, but sustained an injury in the warm up. British Gymnastics medical staff made a thorough assessment before deciding jointly, it was in her best interests to withdraw from the competition. It’s thought Georgia will make a speedy recovery. As for the almost angelic Amy Tinkler, the success story continues.